About Bone Grafting Campbell CA

What is Bone Grafting?

Over a period of time, the jawbone associated with missing teeth atrophies and is resorbed. This often leaves a condition in which there is poor quality and quantity of bone suitable for placement of dental implants. In these situations, most patients are not candidates for placement of dental implants.

With bone grafting, we now have the opportunity to not only replace bone where it is missing, but also the ability to promote new bone growth in that location! This not only gives us the opportunity to place implants of proper length and width, it also gives us a chance to restore functionality and esthetic appearance.

Types of Bone Grafts

Autogenous Bone Grafts:

Autogenous bone grafts, also known as autografts, are made from your own bone, taken from somewhere else in the body. The bone is typically harvested from the chin, jaw, lower leg bone, hip, or the skull (Although only bone from the mouth is used at the Ueno Center when indicated). Autogenous bone grafts are advantageous in that the graft material is live bone, meaning it contains living cellular elements that enhance bone growth.

However, one downside to the autograft is that it requires a second procedure to harvest bone from elsewhere in the body. Depending on your condition, a second procedure may not be in your best interest.

Allogenic Bone:

Allogenic bone, or allograft, is dead bone harvested from a cadaver, then processed using a freeze-dry method to extract the water via a vacuum. Unlike autogenous bone, allogenic bone cannot produce new bone on it’s own. Rather, it serves as a framework or scaffold over which bone from the surrounding bony walls can grow to fill the defect or void.  With the new allografts on the market, bone regeneration is highly predictable with these donor grafts.

Xenogenic Bone:

Xenogenic bone is derived from non-living bone of another species, usually a cow. The bone is processed at very high temperatures to avoid the potential for immune rejection and contamination. Like allogenic grafts, xenogenic grafts serve as a framework for bone from the surrounding area to grow and fill the void.

Both allogenic and xenogenic bone grafting are advantageous in that they do not require a second procedure to harvest your own bone, as with autografts. However, because these options lack autograft’s bone-forming properties, bone regeneration may take longer than with autografts, with a less predictable outcome.

Stem Cells and Growth Factors:

With the modern advances of bone grafting materials today, we are extremely lucky to be able to work with both stem cells and growth factors.  These are safe bone graft additives that can stimulate more and faster bone growth and at the same time reduce swelling and healing time.  They come with an added cost, but are definitely beneficial in larger and more difficult bone grafting cases.

Synthetic Bone:

For those that do not like allografts or xenografts, we do offer synthetic bone.  This man made bone graft substitute can be used, but has a lower efficacy than the previous grafts mentioned.